Scottsdale, AZ Homes For Sale – E Dixileta Drive , Scottsdale, AZ 85266 – $875,000

8400 E Dixileta Drive MLS#: 5510615
Community: SINCUIDADOS-UNIT 2 LOT 109-192 TR A-K
Address: 8400 E Dixileta Drive Scottsdale, AZ 85266
Price: $875,000
Bedrooms: 4
Bathrooms: 3.5
SQFT: 4,051
Status: Active
Description:
Now is the time – PRICE reduced! – Live the ”no worries, no cares” lifestyle in Sincuidados in North Scottsdale. You have worked hard, you’ve made sacrifices along the way for the rewards of today; you’ve decided to make an Arizona home or find a new Arizona home, so we know you are all about lifestyle. Let’s start w/ views – great beautiful views of Pinnacle Peak, Tom’s Thumb, Troon Mt, Lone Mountain, Black Mountain to name a few. Perfectly situated on an interior lot w/lrg windows throughout. Outdoor beauty can be enjoyed from the comfort of being inside. Three of four bedrooms have their own patio access. Master Suite is a true retreat – w/dedicated heated outdoor spa & observation deck

Source: http://www.azhomes.com/scottsdale-homes-for-sale/8400-e-dixileta-drive-scottsdale-az-85266-mls-5510615-1

Learn more at: http://www.patriciagillespie.com

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Phoenix, AZ Homes For Sale – N 52nd Street , Phoenix, AZ 85008 – $299,000

2315 N 52nd Street MLS#: 5599715
Community: RESIDENCES AT OAK CONDOMINIUMS 1ST AMD
Address: 2315 N 52nd Street Phoenix, AZ 85008
Price: $299,000
Bedrooms: 3
Bathrooms: 3
SQFT: 1,663
Status: Active
Description
New Construction just south of Arcadia, close to Tempe, Scottsdale and Phoenix in just minutes. This stunning 3 bedroom residence features modern interiors, spacious bedrooms and high quality finishes. Custom shaker style cabinets, marble tile in the master bathroom, large walk-in closet and so much more at an incredible value. A gated community with pool and walking distance to Papago park.

Source: http://www.azhomes.com/phoenix-homes-for-sale/2315-n-52nd-street-phoenix-az-85008-mls-5599715-1

Learn more at: http://www.azhomes.com

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FAQS from North Scottsdale’s Leading Custom Dream Home Builder

Custom home builder in North ScottsdaleTop Custom Home Question:

What is the average cost of a custom home in the North Scottsdale and Cave Creek area?

Answered by Bordeaux Builders (Custom Dream Home Builder in North Scottsdale):

The average price of the homes we’re doing is between $700,000 and up. That’s probably on the lower end.

Top Custom Home Question:

What do you see, average ranges, and where is Bordeaux Builders in that pricing strategy?

Answered by Bordeaux Builders (Custom Home Builder in North Scottsdale):

The average price, median, is probably closer to $800,000 to $900,000.
We can do custom homes with spending as much money as people want to spend on it. Starting somewhere in the sevens, and going up to eight, nine…you can get a pretty nice home for that price point.

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2051 E Heartwood Lane

2051 E Heartwood Lane MLS#: 5530053
Community: CONTESSA BELLA SITE CONDOMINIUM REPLAT
Address: 2051 E Heartwood Lane Phoenix, AZ 85022
Price: $ 269,900
Bedrooms: 3
Bathrooms: 2.5
SQFT: 1,951
Status: Active
Description
This is a newer community, only two years old & is tucked away in an established neighborhood close to an elementary school, shopping and major freeways. This open floor plan features designer cabinetry, granite countertops at kitchen and bathrooms. Upgraded flooring, surround sound pre-wire, ceiling fans, window treatments, double sinks at both full baths. Large office or game room upstairs, with convenient laundry room upstairs with bedrooms. Built in 2014 this home is highly energy efficient with dual pane windows, 14 SEER high efficiency heat pump, energy efficient CFL lights. Gated community also includes, a full size volleyball court, bbq ramadas, community pool and spa with pool house restrooms and outdoor shower. Fantastic price point for all the upgrades in this beautiful home!

Source: http://www.azhomes.com/phoenix-homes-for-sale/2051-e-heartwood-lane-phoenix-az-85022-mls-5530053-1

Learn more at: http://www.azhomes.com

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2315 N 52nd Street

2315 N 52nd Street MLS#: 5580804
Community: RESIDENCES AT OAK CONDOMINIUMS 1ST AMD
Address: 2315 N 52nd Street Phoenix, AZ 85008
Price: $ 319,900
Bedrooms: 3
Bathrooms: 3
SQFT: 1,654
Status: Active
Description
New Construction just south of Arcadia, close to Tempe, Scottsdale and Phoenix in just minutes. This stunning 3 bedroom residence features modern interiors, spacious bedrooms and high quality finishes. Custom shaker style cabinets, marble tile in the master bathroom, large walk-in closet and so much more at an incredible value. A gated community with pool and walking distance to Papago park.

Source: http://www.azhomes.com/phoenix-homes-for-sale/2315-n-52nd-street-phoenix-az-85008-mls-5580804-1

Learn more at: http://www.azhomes.com

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325 E Coronado Road

325 E Coronado Road MLS#: 5573932
Community: Coronado Commons
Address: 325 E Coronado Road Phoenix, AZ 85004
Price: $ 425,000
Bedrooms: 2
Bathrooms: 2.5
SQFT: 1,731
Status: Active
Description
Coronado Commons is a new community located in the heart of the Midtown Arts District. Two spacious bedrooms and 2 1/2 baths, you have everything you need and more in this dynamic space. The floor plan offers a Office/Den/Studio at the ground floor entry; flexible space however you want to use it! The master suite is designed with walk-in closet, dual sinks and luxurious shower. Large open kitchens, oversized great-rooms and private patios complement this modern luxury living experience.

Source: http://www.azhomes.com/phoenix-homes-for-sale/325-e-coronado-road-phoenix-az-85004-mls-5573932-1

Learn more at: http://www.azhomes.com

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325 E Coronado Road: MLS#: 5580785 Community: Coronado Commons Address: 325 E Coronado Road Phoenix, AZ 85004 Price: $ 529,000 Bedrooms: 3 Bathrooms: 3.5 SQFT: 2,150 Status: Active DescriptionWOW! One of the last remaining ”Uptown” floor plans available in this beautiful new single family townhouse community located in the heart of Mid-Town. High quality finishes, expansive living room and chefs inspired kitchen is just a taste of what this 3 bedroom residences offers. Don’t miss out, there is a reason this community is the best selling community in mid-town check it out for yourself! http://bit.ly/2omuJrU Learn more at: https://goo.gl/w0tZTo

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Q2 2016 Market Report: Tight Inventory Leads to a Need for Speed

  • On average, homes stay on the market for 78 days before closing – more than a week less than a year ago.
  • There are 4.7 percent fewer homes for sale nationwide than there were a year ago.
  • The Zillow Home Value Index rose 5.4 percent over the last year, to $187,000 in June. Rents rose 2.6 percent to a Zillow Rent Index of $1,409.

It’s well known that a lack of homes for sale is limiting home buyers’ choices this home shopping season. But this inventory shortage is also contributing to another home buying hurdle – along with limited options, buyers also have increasingly limited time to make a decision on a home purchase.

The typical U.S. home sold in May (the latest month for which data is available) spent just 78 days on the market, more than a week less than the same time last year (86 days), according to the Q2 2016 Zillow Real Estate Market Report (figure 1). And not only is the time a home spends on the market currently much less than recent months, it’s also well below historic norms. Since the beginning of 2010, the long-term monthly average of the time a typical U.S. home spent on the market before selling is roughly 111 days.

Homes are selling more quickly this year than last in 27 of the nation’s 35 largest metro housing markets – in some cases, much more quickly. In Charlotte (70 days), Philadelphia (98 days) and Pittsburgh (97 days), homes are selling more than two weeks faster this spring compared to a year ago. In the eight markets where homes are taking longer (or at least as long) to sell this year than last, the phenomenon may be more attributable to the fact that realistically, homes in those areas can’t sell much more quickly. In seven of those eight markets, homes are selling more quickly than the current national average of 78 days (Miami, at 103 days, is the lone exception).

Markets in the Bay Area and Pacific Northwest epitomize this need for speed. In San Francisco and San Jose, the typical home sold in just 43 days in May, the fastest-moving large markets in the nation. In Seattle homes sold in 47 days, and in Portland homes sold in 51 days. Considering it typically takes a minimum of 30 days (and often 45 days or longer) for a home sale to close once an initial offer is accepted, the window a buyer realistically has to look at a home and decide whether to make an offer in these markets is astoundingly brief.

Inventory: Even When it’s Up, it’s Down

This increasingly fast-moving market is largely a product of increasingly tight inventory. The number of homes for sale nationwide as of the end of Q2 was down 4.7 percent from the same time a year earlier, and was down year-over-year in 24 of the largest 35 metro markets. The number of homes for sale nationwide has fallen on an annual basis for the past 17 straight months, and in 46 of the past 55 months (figure 2).

And even in those large markets where inventory has risen over the past year, the number of homes for sale remains well below recent highs. In San Antonio, for example, inventory was up a big 20.4 percent year-over-year at the end of Q2 – but still down 61.5 percent from its June 2011 high. In San Jose, inventory rose 15.2 percent in June compared to a year earlier, but is still 61.1 percent below March 2011 highs.

When there are so few homes on the market in the first place, it makes sense that those that are available would be scooped up more quickly. But in addition to the speed of the market being a product of limited inventory, that speed may also be contributing to that scarcity of inventory too. Potential sellers might love the attention their home will get once listed – and the chance for a windfall profit if a bidding war breaks out over it. But many of those sellers also have to turn around and become buyers. They may end up in a bidding war of their own once they try to buy in this environment, if they can even find a suitable home to begin with. Instead, it’s likely that many current homeowners who don’t have to sell are choosing to stay put rather than enter the fray – which in turn only contributes to tighter inventory.

It all adds up to a very competitive market for buyers, and a fast-moving (and potentially very lucrative) market for sellers. In an environment where one may have only a few days to decide to make an offer on a home, it’s critical that buyers and sellers enter the market prepared and with clear eyes, and to resist the temptation to settle for a home that may not suit their needs in the interest of just buying a place. It’s tough going out there, but the right home will become available for those that are patient but prepared to strike fast once it comes on the market.

Home Values: The Pressure’s On

The scarcity of inventory – and the rush to buy those homes that are available – is keeping the upward pressure on home values themselves. At the end of Q2, the median U.S. home was worth $187,000, according to the Zillow Home Value Index, up 5.4 percent from a year ago and 0.4 percent from May (figure 3). National median home values have risen on an annual basis for 47 consecutive months.

Home values rose year-over-year in June in 34 of the country’s 35 largest metro markets. Annual home value growth was faster than the U.S. average in 23 of the largest 35 markets. Among those large markets, annual home value growth in June was fastest in Portland (up 14.8 percent), Denver (12.7 percent) and Dallas-Fort Worth (12.1 percent). Annual growth was slowest in Indianapolis (down 4 percent), Washington, D.C. (up 2 percent) and Baltimore (2.2 percent).

Rents: Reliably Rising

With all the attention paid to rising home values, tight inventory of homes to buy and the increasing speed of the home purchase market, it’s critical not to lose sight of the rental market. In June, national median rents rose 2.6 percent year-over-year and 0.1 percent from May, to $1,409 per month, according to the Zillow Rent Index (figure 4). Similar to home values, on an annual basis, U.S. rents have risen or remained flat for 47 consecutive months.

Rents rose year-over-year in June in all 35 of the country’s largest markets. The annual pace of rental growth was fastest in June in Seattle (up 9.7 percent), Portland (9 percent) and San Francisco (7.4 percent). Interestingly, rents are growing so quickly in Seattle that they grew faster in one month (up 1.1 percent in June from May) than in an entire year in the Chicago (up 0.9 percent from June to June), Washington, D.C. (0.9 percent year-over-year), Cincinnati (0.7 percent) and Indianapolis (0.7 percent) markets.

Outlook

Looking ahead, Zillow expects national home values to continue growing, rising another 2.9 percent through June 2017 to a Zillow Home Value Index of $192,493. U.S. rents are also expected to keep growing over the next year, at a 2.6 percent pace through June 2017 to a Zillow Rent Index of $1,445.

Homes are selling faster than ever as the home shopping season hits its peak. For those looking for a home, be prepared to move quickly. Adding to this difficult buying environment is low inventory – there simply aren’t many homes to choose from. And while this looks like a good time to be a seller, potential move-up buyers may hesitate to list their homes and become buyers. Until the supply increases, it will remain a tough market to find a home.

For those looking to buy a home in a competitive market, here’s some tips to keep in mind:

  • Meet with your lender early and get preapproved for a loan – even before you begin seriously shopping for your new home.
  • Work with an agent who has expertise in the local market. Read reviews on local agents and find someone with a successful record in a tough market.
  • Request to pre-inspect a home before submitting an offer. You risk losing a few hundred dollars if you end up not wanting the house; but if you do, you’ll be able to submit an offer not contingent on home inspections.

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Chip Case: A Visionary, and a Friend

Karl Case
Karl “Chip” Case

I am deeply saddened by the news of the passing of Karl “Chip” Case. Chip was truly one of a kind, a man at once generous, brilliant and curious.

Zillow was born out of a groundswell movement among consumers, researchers and policymakers for more data around everything housing in America. And in no small part, that movement itself owes its beginnings to Chip Case’s work at Wellesley College and the groundbreaking home price index that bears his name.

Prior to the index Case developed alongside Yale University economist Robert Shiller, there was very little transparency in housing beyond what one could glean at a dusty local registry office or by poring over years of county tax records – which wasn’t much. The kind of “basic” housing data we take for granted today, the ability to see how a given housing market has performed over time and relative to other markets, was simply unavailable prior to Case and Shiller’s pioneering efforts.

Given housing’s outsized impact on both the economy and our everyday lives, it’s almost impossible to understate the importance of Case’s achievements in shining a light on this sector. The events of the past decade alone underscore this – and the Case-Shiller index has been providing this insight for upwards of 30 years.

Beyond Chip’s intellectual and academic achievements, what struck me most when I began our journey at Zillow was his intellectual curiosity, openness to new methods and ideas, and generosity of his time in thinking through better ways to understand housing markets. From our earliest days at Zillow, we were interested in exploring newer methodologies for creating housing indices that leveraged more data than was available when Chip and Bob first started out. Our efforts resulted in the Zillow Home Value Index, which uses a hedonic approach instead of the repeat sales methodology used by Case-Shiller.

Rather than being content at stopping at the considerable progress he’d driven personally, Chip always acknowledged that his work was a beginning, not the end, and he was eager to talk with us about new approaches. And his work continued beyond the Case-Shiller index. The Zillow Housing Confidence Index was born out of Case and Shiller’s seminal work at trying to illuminate not only home prices, but the underlying aspirations, expectations and assumptions of homeowners and buyers themselves. It’s important work that we’re proud to continue today in partnership with Terry Loebs at Pulsenomics, a close colleague of both Case and Shiller.

Chip will be greatly missed. He was always striving not only to keep a light on housing, but to make sure that light was as accurate, bright and unblinking as possible. May we all be inspired by his tireless, selfless devotion to the truth.

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A Wealth of Problems: How the Housing Bust Widened the Rich-Poor Gap

  • Of all homes foreclosed upon nationwide after December 2006, 46.7 percent were in the bottom-third of all homes in terms of value, compared to only 16.6 percent of foreclosed homes in the top third.
  • If bottom-tier homeowners had been able to avoid foreclosure, they could have realized big gains in their personal wealth as the value of their homes grew during the recovery.
  • Throughout the recovery, foreclosed U.S. homes showed greater annual appreciation than homes in general, peaking at 12.4 percent in January 2014, and falling to 6.8 percent by April 2016. Overall U.S. home values, over the same time, reached a high of 7.9 percent annual growth in April 2014, with growth slowing to a pace of 4.9 percent by April 2016.

For all the talk of income inequality these days, it is America’s wealth inequality – which includes assets like a person’s home – that is perhaps most striking. The gap between the rich and poor in the U.S. was already wide prior to the Great Recession, and the housing bust and foreclosure crisis that followed only made it worse.

Those wealthier Americans better able to cope with the shock of the housing recession and that managed to avoid foreclosure through the worst of it ended up better off and with even more accumulated wealth at the end of the recession in many areas, according to Zillow’s research. At the same time, lower-income Americans that could not avoid foreclosure have missed out on what could have been massive wealth accumulation during the recovery.

Income Inequality

To be sure, income inequality is directly tied to wealth inequality, and both have huge implications for the housing market. Home affordability for low-income Americans looking to purchase even a modest entry-level home has suffered enormously in recent years – especially relative to middle- and high-income buyers looking to buy progressively more expensive homes and particularly in hot markets (figure 1).

Nationwide, a buyer earning a median annual salary in the bottom one-third of all incomes and looking to buy a home valued in the bottom one-third of all homes would need to spend 22.7 percent of their income on a mortgage as of Q2 2015, the latest quarter for which data is available.[1] A buyer earning an income in the top one-third and looking to buy a more expensive top-tier home would only spend 11.5 percent of their income on a mortgage. A year earlier, a U.S. buyer at the top would have had to devote 11.7 percent of their income to a mortgage. At the same time, a bottom-tier buyer would have needed to spend 22.5 percent of their income to a mortgage. So while mortgage affordability at the top has improved somewhat, it has actually gotten a bit worse at the bottom.

The differences are more striking at a local level. At the end of 2012 in San Francisco, for example, a potential low-income buyer looking to buy a bottom-tier home could have expected to pay 42.2 percent of their income on a mortgage payment – a stretch, yes, but probably doable. But by Q2 2015, that same buyer looking to purchase the same level of home should have expected to pay 68.4 percent of their income on a mortgage. Over the same period, the share of income a middle-income buyer purchasing a middle-tier home could expect to spend on a mortgage rose from 29.1 percent to 39.8 percent; and from 22 percent to 29.7 percent for a high-income buyer purchasing a high-end home.

Beyond simply rising home prices, which are countered to some extent by incredibly low mortgage interest rates that help keep monthly payments low, much of this gap is directly attributable to flat or very weak income growth for the lowest-paid workers (figure 2). In real terms (after adjusting for inflation), bottom-third incomes have actually declined over the last 15 years, so a larger share of income has to go toward everyday expenses – which have increased with inflation and now cost more than in the past. And this affordability gap says nothing of the availability gap. In many markets, even for those low-income buyers that can find a way to afford a home, there are simply no homes available to buy in their price range.

Realistically, in many markets nationwide, low-income buyers today are essentially getting shut out of the market thanks to this one-two punch of declining inventory and deteriorating affordability.

Wealth Inequality

But only looking at current income imbalances misses the other half of the story. Housing – for millions the largest single contributor to personal wealth – was greatly distorted during the housing boom and bust. During the housing boom, homeownership rates rose from around 65 percent in 2000 to almost 70 percent by 2006, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. A big driver of this increase was a lot of newly minted, low-income homeowners who invested whatever wealth they did have into down payments and mortgage payments.

And when the bubble popped, less-expensive homes – often bought by low-income homeowners – were more likely to be foreclosed on than higher-end homes. Of all homes foreclosed upon nationwide after December 2006 (the national market reached peak in 2007, but many local markets entered the bust portion of the housing bubble much earlier), 46.7 percent were in the bottom-third of all homes in terms of value, compared to only 16.6 percent of foreclosed homes in the top third. This trend holds in many large markets, including Philadelphia, Detroit, San Francisco, Boston, Seattle and Milwaukee to name just a few (figure 3).

This is perhaps unsurprising. Lower-income homeowners are less likely to be able to absorb financial shocks and life curveballs, including loss of employment or unexpected medical costs. And even if they were able to scrape by and keep making payments on their home for a while, the simple fact that they lived in a lower-priced home to begin with lowered their odds of ultimately avoiding foreclosure.

At the outset of the recession, home values for lower-priced homes fell much more dramatically than higher-priced homes, meaning the owners of these homes were also more likely to fall into deep negative equity. And homeowners in negative equity are more likely to be foreclosed upon – especially those in deep negative equity that might see little point in throwing good money after bad just to stay in a home they may realistically have little to no hope of one day selling for a profit.

Foreclosure does more than strip the title of a home away from a homeowner – it also strips away any and all wealth a homeowner had in the home, both invested up front in the form of a down payment and accumulated over time through home value appreciation and built-up equity. When a homeowner put little or no money down, that wealth may have been small or even non-existent. But for those that made even modest down payments – and depending on how expensive a market is, a “modest” down payment is still often tens of thousands of dollars – that wealth was wiped out as part of the foreclosure proceedings.

More importantly, though, homeowners foreclosed-upon during the recession never got to realize the sometimes huge increases in their homes’ values during the recovery – and the big gains in wealth that would come with it as home values rise past their initial purchase price. After the national housing market hit bottom, home values started rising quickly again – especially among recently foreclosed, low-tier homes now seen as screaming bargains by investors looking to buy cheap but livable homes and convert them into rentals.

Nationwide, foreclosed homes lost almost 40 percent of their value during the bust, and remain 16 percent below their peak values, despite having risen quite strongly during the recovery (figure 4). The median value of all homes, over the same time, fell roughly 22 percent, and is now 5 percent off peak values. But in some markets, foreclosed home values have recovered all value lost in the recession – and then some. In Denver, for example, foreclosed home values fell by 22 percent, but have since grown by 75 percent since home values bottomed out and are now worth almost 40 percent more than they were during bubble peaks.

If foreclosed homeowners had been able to hold on, they would have been able to see their home’s equity – and therefore their wealth – increase. In fact, throughout the entire recovery foreclosed homes showed greater annual appreciation than homes in general, peaking at 12.4 percent in January 2014, and falling to 6.8 percent by April 2016. Overall U.S. home values, over the same time, reached a high of 7.9 percent annual growth in April 2014, with growth slowing to a pace of 4.9 percent by April 2016.

A Source of Anger

There is no small amount of irony in the fact that, after foreclosure, laws prohibited many former homeowners from buying again for seven years, and so millions were forced to rent the exact same kind of homes they had owned only a few years prior. What’s more, these homeowners exchanged the relative stability and predictability of a monthly mortgage payment for the instability of rent – which has been rising steadily for years and is becoming increasingly unaffordable.

And there’s still more salt to throw on the wound with the benefit of hindsight. It’s likely that millions of hardworking Americans found ways to hold on to their homes through the first few years of the recession, only to be foreclosed upon later – which actually turned out worse for them than simply giving the home up in the early years. A homeowner who foreclosed on a home in 2007 would have theoretically been able to buy again in 2014, and may have realized some of the gains in housing of the past few years. But a homeowner that held out desperately only to finally succumb to foreclosure in 2010 or 2011, won’t be able to buy again until 2017 or 2018.

This state of affairs has given rise to much of the social anger and instability we see today. The 99 percent movement, the increasing homelessness issue, the ever-contentious presidential election and a growing housing affordability crisis all have roots in this growing divide between rich and poor. We’ve taken to calling it income inequality, but that only speaks to a small part of the problem. Wealth inequality is incredibly real, is getting worse and is distressingly unheralded. We hope this research helps bring the issue to light.

 

[1]Income data is sourced from the American Community Survey (ACS), indexed forward because the ACS series ends several years ago. For median income used in the overall affordability analysis, we chain the income data forward using the Employment Cost Index (ECI), which is updated quarterly with a one quarter lag. But income tier data is not published in ECI. To get tiers, we rely on the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES), which is published with a one-year lag, which is why our tier data is only available through July 2015 but our overall affordability is available through Q1 2016.

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